Bourne Shell Introspection

So I was thinking about how to refactor our custom Linux and Solaris init scripts at work. The way FreeBSD does it is to have the scripts in /etc/rc.d define variables with the commands to execute, e.g.,

start_cmd='/usr/sbin/foobard'
stop_cmd='kill `cat /var/run/foobar.pid`'

run_rc_command "$1"

where $1 is “start”, “stop”, or whatever, and run_rc_command is a function loaded from an external file. It can check whether $stop_cmd is defined, and if not, take some default action.

This is great and all, but I was wondering whether it would be possible to check whether a given shell function exists. That way, a common file could implement a generic structure for starting and stopping daemons, and the daemon-specific file could just set the specifics by defining do_start and do_stop functions.

The way to do this in Perl is to iterate over the symbol table of the package you’re looking for, and seeing whether each entry is a function. The symbol table for Foo::Bar is %Foo::Bar::; for the main package, it’s %::. Thus:

while (my ($k, $v) = each %::)
{
	if (defined())
	{
		print "$k is a functionn";
	}
}

sub test_x() {}
sub test_y() {}
sub test_z() {}

But I didn’t know how to do it in the Bourne shell.

Enter type, which tells you exactly that:

#!/bin/sh

# List of all known commands
STD_CMDS="start stop restart status verify"
MORE_CMDS="graceful something_incredibly_daemon_specific"

do_start="This is a string, not a function"

do_restart() {
	echo "I ought to restart something"
}

do_graceful() {
	echo "I am so fucking graceful"
}

for cmd in ${STD_CMDS} ${MORE_CMDS}; do
	if type "do_$cmd" >/dev/null 2>&1; then
		echo "* do_$cmd is defined"
	else
		echo "- do_$cmd is not defined"
	fi
done

And yes, this works not just in bash, but in the traditional, bourne-just-once shell, on every platform that I care about.

So yay, it turns out that the Bourne shell has more introspection than
I thought.

This entry was posted in Hacking, Things I've Learned and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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